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A Calendar of DH-Related Events in the Greater Delaware Valley

If you want to keep abreast of workshops, talks, and other events related to the digital humanities in the Philadelphia area there is a handy calendar of Local Digital Scholarship and Pedagogy Events at the Blended Learning Blog hosted by Bryn Mawr Library’s Educational Technology Services.

Go to: http://blendedlearning.blogs.brynmawr.edu/local-digital-pedagogy-and-scholarship-events/ to learn more. And contact Beth Seltzer at Bryn Mawr if you think you have an event that should be included in the calendar.


Registration for Keystone DH is Now Open

Register at http://keystonedh.network/2017/

Now in its third year, Keystone DH is an annual conference and a network of institutions and practitioners committed to advancing collaborative scholarship in digital humanities research and pedagogy across the Mid-Atlantic.

We are thrilled to announce our 2017 keynote presentation will be delivered by Lauren Klein, Assistant Professor in the School of Literature, Media, and Communication and director of the Digital Humanities Lab at Georgia Tech.

Hope to see a lot of the greater PhillyDH community there!


Upcoming Webinar: Access and Inclusion Through Digital, May 24

Access and Inclusion Through Digital
Wednesday, May 24 3-4 PM EDT
You might think of digital as a potential barrier to entry—how do you know a visitor’s expertise or comfort level with technology? But there are ways to build inclusive digital projects that can even help you engage new or aspirational audiences. A website or mobile app can open up your experience to audiences that can’t access your physical space due to physical, cognitive, geographic, or financial reasons. A digital interactive can expand your ability to interpret an exhibit for visitors you might not otherwise reach.
We’ll discuss ways to design digital systems that are accessible to multiple audiences, including individuals with limited familiarity with technology, and those with physical or cognitive disabilities. We’ll focus on ways to understand and account for potential accessibility issues from the start of a project through user experience methodologies, including persona development, contextual inquiry, and usability testing. We’ll also review methods for considering accessibility throughout the design and development process, including accessibility audits and Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG).
This webinar is for exhibit designers and developers, curators, content developers, and museum technologists.
If you have any questions, please contact Amelia Longo at amelia@interactivemechanics.com.

Call for Participation: Metadata Enhancement for In Her Own Right, at Temple University Library, May 12

The Technical and Metadata Working Group of the NEH-funded project In Her Own Right: Women Asserting Their Civil Rights, 1820-1920 invites librarians, digital humanists, public historians, students of all levels, and allies to enhance data describing materials related to women’s agency, circa 1820-1920. We have letters, journals, diaries, scrapbooks, publications, and pamphlets from seven libraries that tell the story of women working for their and others rights, and we hope to add to the data so that we’ll be able to make maps, timelines, network graphs and other visualizations. (More information about In Her Own Right below.)
How Will This Work?
We will all get together on Friday May 12, 2017 , 1pm – 5pm, Room 130 (Mezzanine Level), Paley Library, 1210 Polett Walk, Temple University. We will all have access to digitized letters, diaries, and other archival material. These items already have some form of description. We will work to describe it in more detail, by adding subjects, dates, personal names, locations and transcriptions.
We will be in a computer lab, and will have access to computers (though you’re welcome to bring your own laptop, if you’d like). We’ll use free Airtable Bases and/or Google Sheets, which will ensure that we can easily share our work and collaborate. Before we begin, we’ll review standards for subjects, names and methods for creating transcriptions.
How to Participate
Use this form to sign up: https://goo.gl/forms/VzYUu1ggMg3F43w12 , indicating your name, email address and any previous experience working with metadata (it’s not mandatory that you do, we’re just curious). If you have any questions about any of this, please feel free to reach out to Scott Ziegler, sziegler@amphilsoc.org .
Benefits to Participating
This is an experimental approach to enhancing library records for unique items. You might be wondering what you get out of this. For students, this is a great way to get started understanding metadata and its role in visualization and digital scholarship, to meet people in the field who share these interests, and to build your resume. For digital humanists, librarians, public historians and everyone, this is a great way to come together as a community to ensure this material is as useful as possible for us all. Everyone who participates will receive credit on the final website. Oh, and of course, there will be pizza.

We know everyone’s busy. This is a sign of appreciation.
Additional Information
● Directions to Temple’s Paley Library : http://library.temple.edu/about/locations/paley/directions
● Non-Temple participants will need to show a photo ID at the door.
● Airtable : https://airtable.com/
● What do we mean by metadata : We mean the structured description of books, letters,
journals and other material that will make it easier to find and identify these material. For example, subjects discussed in a letter, dates of a journal, and place names mentioned in a diary are all forms of metadata. The metadata will be used to create visualizations including maps, timelines, and networks graphs. We’ll discuss all this at the event.
More About In Her Own Right
In Her Own Right: Women Asserting Their Civil Rights, 1820-1920 is a pilot project identifying and aggregating material reflecting the early struggle for women’s rights in the collections of members of the Philadelphia Area Consortium of Special Collections Libraries (PACSCL). The collections document women’s efforts to improve the lives of women, children and families in the 19th and early 20th century, leading to passage of the 19th amendment and suffrage for white women. When completed, collection metadata and representative images will be accessible through a single interface.
Even more information is here: http://pacscl.org/in-her-own-right


Upcoming Event: Unconference: Telling Untold Histories at Rutgers-Newark, May 11

Slightly outside of the Greater Delaware Valley catchment area, but PhillyDHers may be interested in the Telling Untold Histories unconference, which will take place on May 11, 9am-4pm at Rutgers University-Newark. As the name suggests, the goal of the unconference is to bring together public historians with librarians, archivists, artists, museum professionals, students, teachers, and community members to question why the histories we tell in public are not inclusive of the diversity of our communities. We also are trying to empower communities themselves to learn how to tell their own stories, with or without these organizations.

The format includes discussion sessions and lightning talks, and a series of skill-based workshops, some digital humanities-focused. Registration is $20 + small service fee on Eventbrite. It would be amazing to have you join us!

Registration: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/2017-telling-untold-histories-unconference-tickets-31808137997

Conference Website: https://untoldhistories.wordpress.com

If you can’t make it in person, you can keep in touch through Twitter @untoldhistories or on our Facebook page (https://www.facebook.com/groups/TellingUntoldHistories).


Upcoming Event: Lightning Presentation Talks at Temple University DSC/CHAT, April 20

Come for a lightning round of thirteen fast-paced final project presentations that will showcase the digital research of Temple faculty and graduate students supported by the Digital Scholarship Center and the Center for the Humanities at Temple.  Participant presentations focus on the use of digital methods to answer new research questions in the humanities and social sciences.

Presenters include Faculty Fellows and Graduate Externs in the Digital Scholarship Center, and graduate students in the CHAT/DSC Digital Scholars Program for 2016-2017 academic year. Projects range widely, including research on transgender literature, LGBTQ characters in video games, the language of Descartes, WWI trenches, modernist fiction, and Hillary Clinton’s Spanish-language campaign. Researchers employ social media, textual and network analysis methods, along with digital mapping and 3D modeling. Participants come from Art History, Education, English, History, Media and Communication, Philosophy, and Sociology.

When: Thursday, April 20, 2017 // 9:30 am

Where: Paley Library: Ground Floor Lecture Hall — 1210 W. Berks Street, Philadelphia, PA 19122


Upcoming Event: Presentations to Introduce a New Digital Project, Digital Paxton, at the Library Company of Pennsylvania, April 21

The McNeil Center for Early American Studies and the Historical Society of Pennsylvania will be presenting two papers to introduce a new digital project: the Digital Paxton. The talk will be held at the Library Company of Pennsylvania.

Information:

A New Looking-Glass for the 1764 Pamphlet War

In December 1763, following years of gruesome frontier warfare, armed settlers in the Paxton Township exacted revenge on an isolated, unarmed Indian settlement, attacked the Lancaster jailhouse where refugees had taken shelter, and vowed to march all the way to Philadelphia. While these “Paxton Boys” were stopped in Germantown by a delegation led by Benjamin Franklin, their critics and apologists spent the next year battling tooth and nail in print. Co-sponsored with the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, this event will introduce the Digital Paxton Project (digitalpaxton.org), a digital archive and critical edition of the pamphlet war created by Library Company Fellow Will Fenton, Doctoral Candidate at Fordham University. Alongside Fenton’s presentation of the Digital Paxton Project, Scott Paul Gordon, Professor of English at Lehigh University will share his latest Paxton research, “Hidden in Plain Sight: The Paxton Crisis and Moravian Archives.”
Reception to follow

Come see the pop-up exhibition: A New Looking-Glass for the 1764 Pamphlet War
Wednesday, April 5 – Friday, May 5
The exhibition will showcase more than two-dozen exemplary manuscripts, broadsides, pamphlets, and political cartoons from the Library Company, Historical Society of Pennsylvania, American Philosophical Society, and Haverford College Quaker and Special Collections. Access the digital companion today (digitalpaxton.org/exhibition).


Upcoming Event: Presentations, “Building a Corpus and Making it Work,” at University of Pennsylvania Library, May 2

With the collaboration of the Price Lab for Digital Humanities, the
Penn Libraries will be hosting a series of presentations titled,
“Building a Corpus and Making it Work!” on the afternoon of Tuesday,
May 2.  From 1-4, in Van Pelt-Dietrich Library Center Room 626, seven
speakers will discuss projects related to East Asian text
digitization, manipulation, and analysis:

Molly Des Jardin and Brian Vivier (University of Pennsylvania)
Mima Hideki (University of Tokyo)
Kevin Bullaughey (University of Pennsylvania)
Mark Ravinna (Emory University)
Donald Sturgeon (Harvard University)
Aswin Mannepalli (University of Pennsylvania)

We will send around another message soon with full presentation
titles.  Please join us for any or all of this discussion.


Upcoming Event: Queer Encoding Conference will be LiveStreamed at Temple University DSC, April 28.

The Queer Encoding Conference will take place at the NYU Center for Humanities on Friday, April 28. But you do not have to go to New York to catch the event. The Digital Scholarship Center at Temple University will be hosting a live stream of the event.

About the Queer Encoding Conference:

How can the practice of digitization better respond to, and represent, geographically, culturally and otherwise, diverse textual identities? Come and hear leading practitioners in the field talk about how we might work creatively with mark-up languages to be more inclusive, and see strategies in action in the Project Hack.

Schedule:

10:30AM — Introduction: What is TEI and why might I be interested? by Peter Logan (Professor of English and Academic Director of the Digital Scholarship Center, Temple University) and Marion Thain (Associate Director of Digital Humanities, New York University)

11:00AM — Morning Keynote: Using TEI to Encode the History of Chinese Buddhism by Marcus Bingenheimer (Assistant Professor, Department of Religion, Temple University)

12:30PM – Lunch

1:30PM — Afternoon Keynote: Encoding Identity by Julia Flanders (Digital Scholarship Group Director and Professor of the Practice of English, Northeastern University)

3:00PM — Afternoon Break

3:15 – 5:00 PM — Project Hack: Queer Encoding in Action! & Closing Remarks

Program Partners:
NYU Digital Humanities
Fordham Digital Humanities Group, and Office of Research
Digital Scholarship Center, Temple University


Upcoming Workshop: Community Engagement through User Experience at Interactive Mechanics, April 27

Interactive Mechanics, a digital design firm that partners with cultural and educational organizations on design, development, user experience, and strategy, will be hosting a workshop on Thursday, April 27:

Community Engagement through User Experience
Learn to put yourself in your users’ shoes
Thursday, April 27, 2-5 PM | Old City Philadelphia
http://interactivemechanics.com/workshops/

User Experience (UX) is how your visitors feels about a product or service, whether you’re designing a website, an exhibit, or a toaster. How do you know if your target audience is having a good or bad experience? Learn to put yourself in your users’ shoes in order to better understand their motivations, so that you can create a welcoming experience and make something that is useful, easy to use, and enjoyable for them.

We’ll cover the fundamentals of user experience, why it matters, and ways to convince others in your organization to invest in this process. We’ll detail a typical UX journey and common methodologies that are useful for museum professionals, emphasizing ways to engage new and existing communities along the way. We’ll practice research techniques, including interviews and contextual inquiries (observing the way your visitors already interact with your exhibits), that allow you to learn about your visitors’ objectives, rather than designing from assumptions. We’ll develop personas to clarify which new audiences you want to connect with, and what works best for them, asking questions like, Why aren’t they users already? What barriers does your museum present? What needs could you be meeting?

We’ll also review common techniques for evaluating digital content using activities like card sorting and content audits, and we’ll produce rapid prototypes for user testing to conduct evaluations and gather valuable feedback.

This workshop is for exhibit designers and developers, curators, content developers, museum technologists, and marketers. After this workshop, you’ll be able to:

*Implement user experience strategies to better understand new and existing audiences
*Convince others in your organization to adopt this process
*Conduct in-person interviews and contextual inquiry with visitors to learn about their goals and objectives
*Use activities like card sorting and content inventories to understand your digital content
*Produce quick analog and digital prototypes and conduct low-cost evaluations with visitors

If you have any questions, please contact Amelia Longo at amelia@interactivemechanics.com.

 


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