Upcoming Events: Spring Workshop Schedule at Temple University Digital Scholarship Center Now Posted

Announcing Temple University DSC Workshop Series for Spring 2018. The following topics will be covered:

Computational Textual Analysis:
This workshop series will model a mini-collaborative research project, involving experimentation with computational textual analysis tools using the Digital Scholarship Center’s recently digitized corpus of twentieth-century literature. We will begin by discussing various methods and tools for cleaning and preparing a corpus, before deploying a variety of ready-made tools, including the Google Ngram viewer and Voyant, to quantify grammatical, lexical, and organizational structures in dozens of novels. This workshop will also establish a working knowledge of how to deploy and adapt simple programming scripts to run more complex and pointed analyses on multiple texts at once. No prior knowledge of computational textual analysis is necessary.
Wednesday, 11am-12pm; Jan. 17, 24, 31; Feb. 21, 28

Data Cleaning with OpenRefine:
The workshop covers basics and examples of data cleaning with OpenRefine. Feel free to bring your own computer to practice with hands-on examples. Topics will include: data transformation, the General Refine Expression Language, and data reshaping.
Every other Thursday, 12:30-1:30pm; Jan. 25; Feb. 8, 22

Using Unity 3D:
This ongoing hands-on workshop will introduce you to using Unity and show you how to apply it to your re-creation, simulation, virtual reality, or game related projects. Topics include Unity interface and general usage, importing and using Unity Standard Assets and Asset Store, importing and using custom models, scene composition, object interaction, using virtual reality, and more. While programming knowledge is not required, is is suggested for some lessons. You will need a laptop (Mac or PC) and an installation of Unity 3D (free and covered the first lesson) in order to participate.
Every Monday in February 12-1pm; Feb. 5, 12, 19, 26

Mapping Datasets in the Humanities:
This series provides both methodological and technical support for mapping datasets. We will discuss how different fields within the humanities interpret and utilize data as well as the application of tools, such as ArcGIS, Carto, Neatline, NodeGoat, and QGIS.
Tuesdays, 11am-12pm; Jan. 30; Feb. 13, 27; Mar. 13

Intro to Electronics & Arduinos:
The Arduino is a small open source micro controller that allows you to sense and control objects in the physical world. Join us for to learn more about and try building projects with the Arduino as an entry into the realm of physical computing.
Every other Thursday, 11am-12pm; Feb. 1, 15; Mar. 1, 15, 29; Apr. 12, 26

Investigating Twitter:
This workshop will introduce several tools for using Twitter for social science research. Geared towards political science, media studies, and journalism, it will show ways of searching and analyzing Twitter hashtags and other indications of political trends. It will include at least one session on how to identify automated tweets, commonly known as bots. It will draw upon examples from my own research on state propaganda in the Persian Gulf, but asks others to bring in their own ideas for researching how authoritarian governments and social activists alike are using Twitter to promote agendas and ideologies.
Every other Wednesday, 12-1pm
Mar. 14, 28; Apr. 11

Links to sign up for any of these workshops can be found at the Temple DSC Workshops page: https://sites.temple.edu/tudsc/events/workshops/


Upcoming Event: HILT, Humanities Intensive Learning and Teaching, at Penn, June 4-8, 2018

Registration is now open for HILT, Humanities Intensive Learning and Teaching, which will be held at the University of Pennsylvania, June 4-8, 2018.

HILT is a 5-day training institute that includes keynotes, ignite talks, and local cultural heritage excursions for researchers, students, early career scholars and cultural heritage professionals who seek to learn more about Digital Humanities theory, practice, and culture. In addition to the conference’s day-time sessions, participants can enjoy opportunities to explore the city through local dining and special events

Courses being offered at HILT include:

Advocacy by Design
Collections as Data
Connecting Digital Humanities to Public Audiences
Developing Black Digital Humanities Initiatives
Digital Methods for Interdisciplinary Cultural Studies
Digital Surrogates: Representation, Engagement, and Meaning
Humanities Programming with Python
Spaces and Stories in the Black Digital Humanities
Text Analysis

Register for HILT Here


Upcoming Event: Lecture and Workshop by Jodi Cranston at Temple DSC, November 28-29

Temple University’s Digital Scholarship Center is co-sponsoring a lecture and workshop by art historian Jodi Cranston on November 28th and 29th. Both the lecture and workshop are open to the public, though we ask that attendees register for the workshop so we can plan accordingly. Dr. Cranston will discuss her recent digital project, an open-source platform that maps crowd-sourced provenance data to track the ownership of paintings through space and time. Hope to see you there!

Mapping Paintings, Or How to Breathe Life into Provenance
Lecture by Professor Jodi Cranston, Boston University, History of Art & Architecture
Tuesday 28 November 20107
5:00-6:00 PM Temple Contemporary at Tyler

Open to the public, with reception to follow (sponsored by the Art History Graduate Organization)
Lecture sponsored by Department of Art History, General Activities Fund, Temple Contemporary, Temple Libraries Digital Scholarship Center, Faculty Senate Lectures & Forums Committee

Workshop
mappingpaintings.org, A Workshop with Platform Developer
Professor Jodi Cranston, Boston University, History of Art & Architecture
Wednesday 29 November 2017
1:30-3:00 PM Digital Scholarship Center, Paley Library Rom 009
Please register to ensure a place in the workshop!


Upcoming Event: WikiSalon at Chemical Heritage Foundation, May 13

You are invited to this Saturday’s
WikiSalon
May 13, 2017
1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.
Chemical Heritage Foundation
315 Chestnut Street
Philadelphia, PA 19106

Mary Mark Ockerbloom will  be answering questions about Wikipedia and working on articles.
You can bring your computer and edit, or just drop in to visit the museum,
ask questions, or suggest topics that need work!
https://www.chemheritage.org/event/wikisalon-0


A Calendar of DH-Related Events in the Greater Delaware Valley

If you want to keep abreast of workshops, talks, and other events related to the digital humanities in the Philadelphia area there is a handy calendar of Local Digital Scholarship and Pedagogy Events at the Blended Learning Blog hosted by Bryn Mawr Library’s Educational Technology Services.

Go to: http://blendedlearning.blogs.brynmawr.edu/local-digital-pedagogy-and-scholarship-events/ to learn more. And contact Beth Seltzer at Bryn Mawr if you think you have an event that should be included in the calendar.


Upcoming Webinar: Access and Inclusion Through Digital, May 24

Access and Inclusion Through Digital
Wednesday, May 24 3-4 PM EDT
You might think of digital as a potential barrier to entry—how do you know a visitor’s expertise or comfort level with technology? But there are ways to build inclusive digital projects that can even help you engage new or aspirational audiences. A website or mobile app can open up your experience to audiences that can’t access your physical space due to physical, cognitive, geographic, or financial reasons. A digital interactive can expand your ability to interpret an exhibit for visitors you might not otherwise reach.
We’ll discuss ways to design digital systems that are accessible to multiple audiences, including individuals with limited familiarity with technology, and those with physical or cognitive disabilities. We’ll focus on ways to understand and account for potential accessibility issues from the start of a project through user experience methodologies, including persona development, contextual inquiry, and usability testing. We’ll also review methods for considering accessibility throughout the design and development process, including accessibility audits and Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG).
This webinar is for exhibit designers and developers, curators, content developers, and museum technologists.
If you have any questions, please contact Amelia Longo at amelia@interactivemechanics.com.

Call for Participation: Metadata Enhancement for In Her Own Right, at Temple University Library, May 12

The Technical and Metadata Working Group of the NEH-funded project In Her Own Right: Women Asserting Their Civil Rights, 1820-1920 invites librarians, digital humanists, public historians, students of all levels, and allies to enhance data describing materials related to women’s agency, circa 1820-1920. We have letters, journals, diaries, scrapbooks, publications, and pamphlets from seven libraries that tell the story of women working for their and others rights, and we hope to add to the data so that we’ll be able to make maps, timelines, network graphs and other visualizations. (More information about In Her Own Right below.)
How Will This Work?
We will all get together on Friday May 12, 2017 , 1pm – 5pm, Room 130 (Mezzanine Level), Paley Library, 1210 Polett Walk, Temple University. We will all have access to digitized letters, diaries, and other archival material. These items already have some form of description. We will work to describe it in more detail, by adding subjects, dates, personal names, locations and transcriptions.
We will be in a computer lab, and will have access to computers (though you’re welcome to bring your own laptop, if you’d like). We’ll use free Airtable Bases and/or Google Sheets, which will ensure that we can easily share our work and collaborate. Before we begin, we’ll review standards for subjects, names and methods for creating transcriptions.
How to Participate
Use this form to sign up: https://goo.gl/forms/VzYUu1ggMg3F43w12 , indicating your name, email address and any previous experience working with metadata (it’s not mandatory that you do, we’re just curious). If you have any questions about any of this, please feel free to reach out to Scott Ziegler, sziegler@amphilsoc.org .
Benefits to Participating
This is an experimental approach to enhancing library records for unique items. You might be wondering what you get out of this. For students, this is a great way to get started understanding metadata and its role in visualization and digital scholarship, to meet people in the field who share these interests, and to build your resume. For digital humanists, librarians, public historians and everyone, this is a great way to come together as a community to ensure this material is as useful as possible for us all. Everyone who participates will receive credit on the final website. Oh, and of course, there will be pizza.

We know everyone’s busy. This is a sign of appreciation.
Additional Information
● Directions to Temple’s Paley Library : http://library.temple.edu/about/locations/paley/directions
● Non-Temple participants will need to show a photo ID at the door.
● Airtable : https://airtable.com/
● What do we mean by metadata : We mean the structured description of books, letters,
journals and other material that will make it easier to find and identify these material. For example, subjects discussed in a letter, dates of a journal, and place names mentioned in a diary are all forms of metadata. The metadata will be used to create visualizations including maps, timelines, and networks graphs. We’ll discuss all this at the event.
More About In Her Own Right
In Her Own Right: Women Asserting Their Civil Rights, 1820-1920 is a pilot project identifying and aggregating material reflecting the early struggle for women’s rights in the collections of members of the Philadelphia Area Consortium of Special Collections Libraries (PACSCL). The collections document women’s efforts to improve the lives of women, children and families in the 19th and early 20th century, leading to passage of the 19th amendment and suffrage for white women. When completed, collection metadata and representative images will be accessible through a single interface.
Even more information is here: http://pacscl.org/in-her-own-right


Upcoming Event: Lightning Presentation Talks at Temple University DSC/CHAT, April 20

Come for a lightning round of thirteen fast-paced final project presentations that will showcase the digital research of Temple faculty and graduate students supported by the Digital Scholarship Center and the Center for the Humanities at Temple.  Participant presentations focus on the use of digital methods to answer new research questions in the humanities and social sciences.

Presenters include Faculty Fellows and Graduate Externs in the Digital Scholarship Center, and graduate students in the CHAT/DSC Digital Scholars Program for 2016-2017 academic year. Projects range widely, including research on transgender literature, LGBTQ characters in video games, the language of Descartes, WWI trenches, modernist fiction, and Hillary Clinton’s Spanish-language campaign. Researchers employ social media, textual and network analysis methods, along with digital mapping and 3D modeling. Participants come from Art History, Education, English, History, Media and Communication, Philosophy, and Sociology.

When: Thursday, April 20, 2017 // 9:30 am

Where: Paley Library: Ground Floor Lecture Hall — 1210 W. Berks Street, Philadelphia, PA 19122


Upcoming Event: Presentations to Introduce a New Digital Project, Digital Paxton, at the Library Company of Pennsylvania, April 21

The McNeil Center for Early American Studies and the Historical Society of Pennsylvania will be presenting two papers to introduce a new digital project: the Digital Paxton. The talk will be held at the Library Company of Pennsylvania.

Information:

A New Looking-Glass for the 1764 Pamphlet War

In December 1763, following years of gruesome frontier warfare, armed settlers in the Paxton Township exacted revenge on an isolated, unarmed Indian settlement, attacked the Lancaster jailhouse where refugees had taken shelter, and vowed to march all the way to Philadelphia. While these “Paxton Boys” were stopped in Germantown by a delegation led by Benjamin Franklin, their critics and apologists spent the next year battling tooth and nail in print. Co-sponsored with the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, this event will introduce the Digital Paxton Project (digitalpaxton.org), a digital archive and critical edition of the pamphlet war created by Library Company Fellow Will Fenton, Doctoral Candidate at Fordham University. Alongside Fenton’s presentation of the Digital Paxton Project, Scott Paul Gordon, Professor of English at Lehigh University will share his latest Paxton research, “Hidden in Plain Sight: The Paxton Crisis and Moravian Archives.”
Reception to follow

Come see the pop-up exhibition: A New Looking-Glass for the 1764 Pamphlet War
Wednesday, April 5 – Friday, May 5
The exhibition will showcase more than two-dozen exemplary manuscripts, broadsides, pamphlets, and political cartoons from the Library Company, Historical Society of Pennsylvania, American Philosophical Society, and Haverford College Quaker and Special Collections. Access the digital companion today (digitalpaxton.org/exhibition).


Upcoming Workshop: Community Engagement through User Experience at Interactive Mechanics, April 27

Interactive Mechanics, a digital design firm that partners with cultural and educational organizations on design, development, user experience, and strategy, will be hosting a workshop on Thursday, April 27:

Community Engagement through User Experience
Learn to put yourself in your users’ shoes
Thursday, April 27, 2-5 PM | Old City Philadelphia
http://interactivemechanics.com/workshops/

User Experience (UX) is how your visitors feels about a product or service, whether you’re designing a website, an exhibit, or a toaster. How do you know if your target audience is having a good or bad experience? Learn to put yourself in your users’ shoes in order to better understand their motivations, so that you can create a welcoming experience and make something that is useful, easy to use, and enjoyable for them.

We’ll cover the fundamentals of user experience, why it matters, and ways to convince others in your organization to invest in this process. We’ll detail a typical UX journey and common methodologies that are useful for museum professionals, emphasizing ways to engage new and existing communities along the way. We’ll practice research techniques, including interviews and contextual inquiries (observing the way your visitors already interact with your exhibits), that allow you to learn about your visitors’ objectives, rather than designing from assumptions. We’ll develop personas to clarify which new audiences you want to connect with, and what works best for them, asking questions like, Why aren’t they users already? What barriers does your museum present? What needs could you be meeting?

We’ll also review common techniques for evaluating digital content using activities like card sorting and content audits, and we’ll produce rapid prototypes for user testing to conduct evaluations and gather valuable feedback.

This workshop is for exhibit designers and developers, curators, content developers, museum technologists, and marketers. After this workshop, you’ll be able to:

*Implement user experience strategies to better understand new and existing audiences
*Convince others in your organization to adopt this process
*Conduct in-person interviews and contextual inquiry with visitors to learn about their goals and objectives
*Use activities like card sorting and content inventories to understand your digital content
*Produce quick analog and digital prototypes and conduct low-cost evaluations with visitors

If you have any questions, please contact Amelia Longo at amelia@interactivemechanics.com.

 


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